Tag Archives: technique

Working on Selfie Respect… Street Photography Self Portraiture Thoughts

Street photography self portraits… I had an interesting morning a few months back at 5am in Centre Place. This unexpected expedition, along with my admiration for Vivian Maier’s self portraits, has got me thinking about a project theme. As per my usual modus operandi, the first step is to look through other people’s images that appeal […]

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How to lead a more interesting life through Street Photography… First Timer Primer

Things you hear when people are thinking about starting out in street photography… “What book should I read or class should I do?” “Where should I go?” “What is the best camera / bag / lens / etc?” “What do I do if someone approaches me after taking their photo?” The most important response to […]

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Juxtaposition – Cheap Shots!

After feeling a bit “out of the zone” yesterday, juxtapositional compositions came to the rescue. Just find a great sign and wait for the right subject to come into frame.   They are a staple for a lot of street photographers – although it takes a fair bit to add enough to the composition to […]

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Does Film Still Matter to Street Photography?

The simple answer is “no”… But why cling to the analogue aesthetic and process? I have noticed a few of my previous stalwart film buddies exiting the genre recently as well, leaving me both a little heartbroken and worried about film. I am not going to prattle on about the dynamic range of film vs digital […]

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Urbanity Image Review #9

Taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. There are weddings happening all over Hong Kong during the week. They appear quite random. Just the bride, groom, maybe one or two others and photographers with magnificent kits of gear. Probably not much different to Melbourne, it is just unusual to see them all week on the streets […]

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Urbanity Image Review #8

Taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. Temple Street Night Market. Well, there is a theme here – a few shots from the Temple Street Night Market made the cut, and there were a few more that got very close to be included in the Urbanity Exhibition. The more you practice a skill, the more you […]

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Urbanity Image Review #7

Taken in Hong Kong March 2014. Another ripper from the International Finance Centre. Make sure you give it a good look if you are in town. The simplicity of this image is what I love. Simple tones and colours, clearly framed in three key blocks, let the composition elements stand out. Things in threes continue […]

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Urbanity Image Review #6

Another image taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. Taken at night in the bright lights that don’t seem to have an off switch. The complete cool indifference of the girl to her surroundings is a universal truth for all “door bitches” around the world. She is some kind of gatekeeper for the “VIP Bar” up […]

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Urbanity Image Review #5

Beware, I get a bit more technical liney on this one… Taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. I am pretty sure this was at the International Finance Center. A perfect set of circumstances for black and white film… The IFC is surrounded by some awesome overhead covered walkways and connects through to the Hong Kong […]

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Urbanity Image Review #4

Taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. For the record, I shot a total of 32 rolls of Ilford HP5 and AGFA APX 400 on this trip – approximately 1000 shots for a total of 13 final images for the exhibition. A hit rate of 1.3% if my math is correct? Hmmm, if you are going […]

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Urbanity Image Review #3

Taken in Melbourne, August 2014. Location is Degraves Street, I think? The Flinders Street end. The only image in the collection leveraging the use of a model. Sometimes ya gotta try new things. There were a few ideas I had that were going to be much easier to realise with a more predictable set of […]

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Urbanity Image Review #2

Taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. Some careful preparation rewarded with an opportunity.   The Hong Kong Cultural Centre is regarded by many as one of the worst eyesores in the city. It looks just like a massive block of concrete, without windows, without hope, like a jail. The concrete provides some great texture and […]

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Urbanity Image Review #1

Taken in Hong Kong, March 2014. A somewhat “lucky” shot. There are three distinct planes in the image defined by the location of each of the subjects. I am starting to love finding different, clearly defined planes in images. The suggested lines of diminishing perspective (the long arrows!) are accentuated by the lateral lines of the […]

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Urbanity Photographic Exhibition – The Story

Below is an updated article (original here) featured in the Image Catalogue for the Urbanity Exhibition. Over the next weeks, I will be presenting a review of each image and some thoughts around why it appealed to me.   Ever found that you have started taking the same image over and over? A particular type of […]

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AAMI Park Stadium

Melbourne is sports crazy. AFL, Rugby League & Union, Soccer, Cricket, and the list goes on. The stadiums for these sports all offer fantastic urban landscape opportunities, and an opportunity to shoot the fans. AAMI Park Stadium has a unique triangle filled roof. There is also plenty of concrete to inspire your photography. The Holga image above […]

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Featured Image – Matthew Joseph – Panoramarama

From the Photographer – Matthew Joseph “This shot is a particular favourite of mine, I took it in March 2005 in Brisbane. I was wandering around the Queen Street Mall and walked into the Myers Centre, I used to come here when I was younger. I wanted to take some above view photos of people […]

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Book Review – The Street Photographer’s Manual

A great little book to drive inspiration on those days where you are a bit ho-hum about it all. The author, David Gibson has written a whole book full of tasty little bits and pieces to get any street photographer fiesty and firing the shutter! The book focuses on short profiles of street photography masters, […]

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Featured Melbourne Image “Five Ways” – Dee Smith

Dee’s print “Five Ways” is an excellent example of toy camera photography. It was taken on a Holga using Kodak Ektar iso 100 negative film. I picked up Dee’s print at the recent Melbourne Silvermine analogue exhibition “Unsensored 2014”. The exhibition is annual event aimed at demonstrating the art of film photography lives on! You […]

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Free Open Source Street Photography Course

Eric Kim is a great source of inspiration for street photographers. He sets a great example by bringing a disciplined approach to learning and the creative process. He has brought together a whole bunch of his great content into a structured Street Photography course. You can find the course here : http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2014/02/04/free-open-source-online-street-photography-course-all-the-worlds-a-stage-introduction-to-street-photography/ There is some […]

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Vivian Maier – Composition Ideas – Intro

Vivian Maier was a Chicago based street photographer who was only recently discovered after her death in 2009. I have been reading the book “Vivian Maier – Street Photographer” which features some of her best work. Maier’s work includes some travel photography, self portraits, and street photography. You can read more about her here. I […]

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The Art of Bar Photography – Part Two

In the last article,  I outlined some basic guidelines to getting subjects to pose in bars. This time, I am going to share the story behind some of my personal favourites to help illustrate the lessons. The Punk Kid Taken at The Corner Hotel in Richmond. Delta 3200 film – hence the extreme grain I […]

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The Art of Bar Photography – Part One

I was hanging out with a few photography buddies at a pub called the “Marquis of Lorne”. What a pub named after Lorne was doing in Fitzroy confused me somewhat, but we had a great day over a few pints and cameras. One of my esteemed colleagues commented on the preponderance of portraits of younger […]

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Don’t Just Make a Carbon Copy

Architectural Photography is a passion for some. Taking a shot of a building’s interior or exterior, with the perfect lens, on a perfectly still tripod, with the perfect light, and at the perfect angle is challenging pursuit that requires patience. The same applies to Landscape photography. The result can often transcend the technique. But mostly […]

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360 Collins St – High Persepective

After spending some time studying Fan Ho, I realised that too many of my images were captured from a consistent perspective of about 5ft 8inches – head height… Images become more interesting when they show something from a new perspective. You can read more about this and Fan Ho’s work here. Finding high or low […]

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Inconspicuosity Tip #2 : Angles

How little people notice can be quite amazing. Photo ninja skillz do not involve things like stealthy camera bags with lens holes or 90 degree angle mirror attachments. Actively “hiding” when out with your camera is a tad on the childish side. The less you are noticed, the less you will contaminate or interfere with […]

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Fan Ho – 9 Composition Techniques. Part Two.

2. Light Edges Light Edges are very clear, defined strips of light contrasting with a shadow. These feature regularly in Ho’s images to highlight what is usually a small human subject. The size of the subject removes the “human” face and enables the viewer to project themselves into being the subject (IMHO). These Light Edges […]

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Fan Ho – 9 Composition Techniques. Part One.

Fan Ho has captured Hong Kong over the years using a Rolleiflex. Born in 1937, Ho has an important body of work that borrows from his experience as a Hong Kong based film director. You can find out more about him at his website here, and an interview with him here. I have one of his […]

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First Steps – Landmarks

One of the first subjects with minimum stress levels are landmarks. Landmarks I am using this as a generic term for any interesting inanimate subject. It could be a sculpture, a sign on the road, a factory door, public artwork, graffiti – if it ain’t breathing (and is not just dead!) then it is a […]

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